School denies MBA woes

THE WITS Business School (WBS) denies claims that its MBA degree is in danger of losing international accreditation.

Last week, Wits Vuvuzela reported claims that there were less than 14 students in the full-time MBA class, below the required 20 needed to maintain its accreditation with the Association of MBAs (Amba).

WBS communications manager, Jackie Mapiloko, denied this and said there were 15 people in the class and there was no threat to the accreditation.

Mapiloko said the intake of students in 2013 was 107, including those in the full-time class.

“Even where one intake in a specific class has less than 20 students, Amba gives a business school an opportunity to correct that.”

Mapiloko said Amba looked at more than just the number of students before a school lost accreditation.

She said it looks at the credibility of the institution as well.

“Even where one intake in a specific class has less than 20 students, Amba gives a business school an opportunity to correct that,” Mapiloko said.

“Wits has a long-standing history of being a leader in business education.

It is expected that the majority of the faculty will hold a doctorate. Nearly 80% of the faculty has PhDs,” she said.

Mapiloko said WBS had also strengthened the criteria for students who make it into the course as this was also a major part of what the Amba reviews.

Wits Vuvuzela also reported that a lecturer at WBS said problems were caused by lack of leadership.

The Financial Mail referred to a number of resignations over the past few years that may have contributed.

Mapiloko said she would not comment on the leadership prior to head of school Wendy Ngoma’s takeover and said they had faith in the current leadership at the school.

She said the curriculum for 2014 had been revamped and would provide a world-class programme for prospective students.

According to Business Day live, Ngoma said the situation had “been worsened this year by Wits Business School being included for the first time in the university’s central enrolment system”.

“The full-time, five-day week programme option is thus becoming less practical for prospective working students.”

However, Mapiloko said she did not believe administrative issues were the cause of a drop in enrolment.

She said this could be connected to the financial crisis and high demands on working people.

“There is a predominant shift in the South African market to part-time programmes.

This may be due to career management pressures, flex-ibility and the need for job security.

“The full-time, five-day week programme option is thus becoming less practical for prospective working students.”

Mapiloko said the school always looked into administrative issues when they arose. She said the report being drafted for the vice chancellor would not be made public as it was an internal matter.

shandu@witsvuvuzela.com

RELATED ARTICLES:

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s